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Common Types of Sheds


Wooden sheds provide a classic look to any home garden or backyard; they're usually a popular choice due to the variety of building material options. They have become more prevalent since the introduction of treated wood, which can compete against the durability of metal and plastic variants. Untreated wood can become unreliable over time due to rot, warp, and split beams. You can usually pick up preservatives and stains to help protect against weather, fungus, and termites; these are available at any local hardware store. Cedar is usually a popular starting point due to its naturally water resistant properties.
The main case for building a wooden shed is the opportunity to modify the existing structure to create more space, add windows, shelving, trim, etc.

Metal:
Metal sheds usually get a bad reputation aesthetically (probably still a second to plastic) due to the type of material wear over time. Rust can be incredibly problematic from a longevity standpoint, but it can depend on the metal sheet being used: galvanized steel, aluminum, and corrugated iron are among the main choices.
Weight can pose another potential issue for homeowners since metal sheds weigh significantly less than wood versions. If you live in a windy climate it's advisable to attach it to a concrete foundation.

Plastic:
Plastic sheds use an extremely durable molded plastic such as PVC, which provides a cheap and durable alternative to metal. Overall, plastic sheds are stronger, more durable, and generally lighter than metal. This makes them a popular choice around the country.
Unlike wood or metal sheds you generally do not need a permit to build a plastic shed on your property (varies by geography). There are also many pre-built options to select from, which come in a flat pack kit. You can pick these up from local hardware stores and have them set up in an afternoon.

Vinyl-sided:
If you have the money to spend then these are a great option. Generally construction of a vinyl-sided shed on your property requires a permit since they're usually built with standard framing construction. The vinyl is then attached over the pre-built frame, and should not require any sort of painting. The vinyl siding is usually the same you would find on a typical home.
Their strength and durability make them one of the best fits for any sort of weather.

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